Alan Turing Cipher Clue’s

As so many of you are struggling with the Alan Turing cipher I’ve decided to post a clue.

Here is the 1st clue to the cipher (24/06/2012):

SXQncyBub3QgYSBDYWVzZXIgY2lwaGVyCg==
It's not a Caesar cipher

Here is the 2nd clue to the cipher (26/06/2012):

NWE0MjQ1NDY1MjIwNTU0ZTQ2MjA1ODUyNGM0NjIwNGE0MjQ1NTEyMDQxNTI1NjQxMjA1YTUyNGU0MTQ2MjA0MTQy
MORSE HAS KEYS WORD NEIN MEANS NO

Here is the 3rd clue to the cipher (27/06/2012):

Unit under attack, book burnt, operator had to resend keys. He was in a hurry 
so he might have made a mistake, can you spot it?

Here is the 4th clue to the cipher (29/06/2012):

It's not a one time pad, and the decrypted message is in English!

Here is the 5th clue to the cipher (30/06/2012):

Blaise can't help you here! Look to a certain Mr. Wheatstone!

Here is the 6th clue to the cipher (01/07/2012):

Binary the digital age! Look to the old!

Here is the 7th clue to the cipher (06/07/2012):

People need to Play fair! Sometimes encryption works just as well as decryption!

Interesting discussion’s here http://www.reddit.com/r/codes/comments/velgz/crack_the_alan_turing_cipher_challenge/, if people know of any others please let me know.

Solution to the cipher will be posted once a winner is announced.

This entry was posted in Cryptography, Cyber Security Challenge UK. Bookmark the permalink.

20 Responses to Alan Turing Cipher Clue’s

  1. David Kilmer says:

    The thing that puzzles me about the playfair thing is that there are repeating letters in the digraphs however you split them up (WW twice in the morse, and several in the main text, regardless of whether it’s read column-wise or row-wise). This is what indicated against a playfair in the first place for me (although I guess that could be the “mistake” the operator made).

    If the solution involves encrypting the text or morse with playfair, you’d need to modify the text to do it, which seems to violate the spirit of the puzzle.

    • The Grand Inquisitor says:

      Not at all, all you need is the key, how you find the key is perhaps the challenging bit, it is not a random string and it is associated in some way with Alan Turing. You do not need to shuffle any letters around, as I mentioned in clue 7, “encryption works just as well as decryption”.

      Everything used to create this challenge is freely available on the Internet, as is all the information regarding Turing and any encoding, enciphering techniques I have used.

      • Darkfibre says:

        Should I read clue 7 as “we changed things up to break your tools?” As in you decrypted the pt instead of encrypting it?

        I used to know how to do this manually…

        • The Grand Inquisitor says:

          It doesn’t break any tools, you merely need to encrypt the message.

  2. Also confused says:

    Still trying to crack this before you release the solution!

    Based on previous comments on here and twitter, am I heading in the right direction by thinking that the morse may be a naval type code based on a manual seriated cipher like the Werftschlüssel?

  3. Y29uZnVzZWQNCg== says:

    Sorry, miscounted, please ignore!

    If the messages are in English why did you explain that “Nein means no”?

    • The Grand Inquisitor says:

      Someone on twitter wasn’t sure what it meant so tried to clarify it.

      • Y29uZnVzZWQNCg== says:

        Danke. Are all the clues on this page now then?

        • The Grand Inquisitor says:

          Might want to look on Twitter for what other people have been asking. I haven’t publish them here because they were not my clue’s. But there are some interesting idea’s floating about. Not saying if they are correct just that they are interesting.

          Are you enjoying the challenge?

          • Y29uZnVzZWQNCg== says:

            Enjoying the challenge, but not the headaches. I am tempted to set my own challenge in revenge …

            I am also assuming that we don’t need to build an Enigma machine?

          • The Grand Inquisitor says:

            @Y29uZnVzZWQNCg== I enjoy a good challenge, the problem for me is that I’m the only one that can’t take part. My collegues can take part but can’t win, but still they can have a play.

            There’s really no need to construct an Enigma machine, there are plenty of them on the Internet.

  4. The Grand Inquisitor says:

    Both messages are in English, OTP was not used as it is too difficult to crack without having multiple messages that have been encrypted with the same key.

    • MrAdz says:

      Back to the drawing board then! I’m not sure which will be cracked first, me or the cipher!

      • The Grand Inquisitor says:

        I’m sure that won’t be the case. Sorry I can’t be more specific, just remember there’s always a key of some sort.

  5. Y29uZnVzZWQNCg== says:

    Q2Flc2FyIHNheXMgbGlzdGVuIHRvIG1lDQpmYm9uZnJmdmtnbHNiaGVzYmVweWhyYmFybnlmYnNiZXB5aHJnamJiZWFiZ25hbGJndXJldXJ5Y0NGUG5yZm5ldmZmY3J5eXJxanZndWdqYm5mbGJoeGFiag0K

    • The Grand Inquisitor says:

      Hi,
      The encoding and cipher used here is in no way related to the possible ciphers used. The misspelling of “Caesar” is my mistake.

      I used the different encoding and cipher to make it a little more interesting, I didn’t want to make this too easy. The biggest clue I can give is think of the man we are celebrating!

      • Also confused says:

        Is the morse purely for keys or does that contain a key for the cipher in the flag? Or is the morse part key, part cipher?

        Are you able to say if it is army, navy or airforce message? I’m assuming not a navy code as the indicators are not present, but then it could be a non-standard! Or perhaps, is it a different type of machine that the great man worked on, e.g. Lorenz?

        p.s. Great challenge – loving it!

        • The Grand Inquisitor says:

          Please see update, maybe it will help… I’m glad your enjoying the challenge. Remember it’s just a bit of fun, people shouldn’t get too stressed about it, it’s more about the man, research! :-)